Communal vaccine debate continues

CDC

As our communal discourse about vaccines continues, I am in part relieved just to see people at least willing to talk somewhat openly about the taboo subject. To quote Jon Rappoport of Nomorefakenews.com, “Vaccines are the holy sacrament of the medical church; they are supposed to be left alone.”

My heart, on the other hand, feels constricted as I see that the majority of people will continue to lap at the CDC’s feeding trough, hungry for the continuum of their comforting assurances – Life is safe. You are safe. We will protect you. Those big scary conspiracy theorists can’t puncture your safety net as long as we’re around. 

I digress.

Printed in the September 10th, 2014 edition of the Homer News, a concerned citizen writes:

“I was dismayed to read the fear mongering anti-vaccination opinion piece by Ashley Gregoire published in the Homer news recently. She asserts that there was a major Centers for Disease Control “coverup” that recently came out, but she was terribly short on facts. The “coverup” was instead a disagreement on statistical data analysis reporting from one team member on a paper that was published 10 years ago.”

Allow me to respond with a statement that is not my own.

“My name is William Thompson. I am a senior Scientist with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, where I have worked since 1998. 

I regret that my coauthors and I omitted statistically significant information in our 2004 article published in the journal Pediatrics. The omitted data suggested that African-American males who received the MMR vaccine before age 36 months were at an increased risk for autism. Decisions were made regarding which findings to report after the data were collected, and I believe that the final study protocol was not followed.”

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Dr. Thompson goes on to say that he still believes in the necessity of vaccines ect., but that the CDC has a responsibility to be straight forward about potential side effects.

I do not see this to be a report of disagreement among colleagues, barring the obvious fact that they probably disagree with Mr. Thompson’s recent decision to come clean. I see this as a clear admission of medical fraud.

It is also worth noting that two of Mr. Thompson’s aforementioned coauthors, Colleen Boyle and Frank DeStefano, hold positions as CDC research scientists under a conflict of interest as they are also high ranking CDC executives. This basically means they work the PR front for the CDC, making folks comfortable while simultaneously cooking data behind the scenes.

colleen-boyle

The concerned Homer citizen goes on to state that I fail to mention the 2010 retraction of Dr. Andrew Wakefield’s 1998 submission to the Lancet suggesting a connection between MMR and the development of autism. I have a great deal of respect for Dr. Wakefield as the pioneer of medical and scientific integrity that he is. You can learn more about his fascinating story, research and vindication herehttp://youtu.be/LgWkhWkd_vo .

andrew-wakefield

Delving further into this letter, said citizen voices concern for her safety and for the collective immunity of our community. Herd immunity, as I have voiced before, is a mythological phenomenon. There is absolutely no credible scientific evidence to prove that herd immunity is anything beyond a scare tactic, and if we look at the numbers we can conclude it is an outrageous lie.

Children under 15 years of age make up only 20% of the American population, and when we consider the fact that vaccines induce immunity lasting 5 – 10 years in the instances where they are effective at all, we are looking at a population wherein 80% of people are unvaccinated.

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“Herd immunity is not a scare tactic made up by conspirators to devalue your individual freedoms. That is paranoia. Herd immunity works on a population-level basis and is fairly straightforward in it’s effectiveness – we have seen our collective immunity decrease as fear mongering like what we read from Mrs. Gregoire plays with the emotions of parents.”

No such collective immunity exists in scientific literature, nor do we observe it in everyday life. For example, every winter my children are exposed to every head cold and flu bug that flies around Homer, and in the uncommon instance they catch something it is generally very mild and short lived. This is because true immunity is dependent on personal responsibility in so far as one’s willingness to protect oneself through nutrition, supplementation, lifestyle and sanitation.

And I suppose, to this author, there is a fine line between the fear monger and the parent of a vaccine-injured child.

Or are the tales of vaccine-injured children another scary bedtime conspiracy story lacking in societal relevance?

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All facts aside, the concern raised in this letter to the editor is legitimate and does not deserve harsh critique. In fact, no one individual, even within the medical community, is to blame for the spread of disinformation about vaccines; it is trust in a faulty system based on greed that is at the heart of discord between citizens on matters such as these.

It is not our collective immunity that should be called into question in Homer, AK. Our collective consciousness for the world and our neighbors beside us, however, is seemingly in trouble.

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